July 27, 2009

Milwaukee M12 LED Worklight - Review

milwaukee_led_light.jpgMilwaukee recently entered the 12-volt fray with a work light and because it's an LED, according to Milwaukee, it's twice as bright as a regular incandescent bulb. The light has a good, solid, ready-for-the-job-site feel to it and it fits the hand just like a lightsaber would (our second Star Wars reference in a week!). It has a small magnet along the handle and the head pivots 90 degrees with seven hard stops along the way, making it very easy to direct the light. It also can stand up on the battery end, aiding the process as well.

And what a light it is. It's absolutely blinding and we're suspicious of the claim that it's twice as bright as a regular light. To us, it seems about ten times brighter. And not only is this thing bright, it's focused too. Even at 50' away the line between what is being lit and what isn't is very clearly defined. In fact, it reminds us of the spotlight from a 1960s prison movie or the cartoon intro to the Pink Panther movies. There's no gray area with this light, when it's on there's the area that looks like daylight and the area that is black.

milwaukee_led_controls.jpgmilwaukee_led_rightangle.jpg

We had it at work for a while and in that setting it's ideal. The magnet lets it hang nicely from a metal stud or a pipe and the pivoting head does the rest. We had to cut a hole in the ceiling of a little curtain pocket where there was no way to fit us, our Fein, our ladder, and any sort of regular sized work light. So we took the Milwaukee and used the magnet to attach it to a metal junction box and easily completed our task. Without the tool, it would have been a real struggle.

milwaukee_led_optics.jpgWe also took it along for a few night time walks in the woods and there, if you can believe it, it was too bright. There was a good moon out so for the most part we relied on that but from time to time, we'd need to click the light on to find the path. The Milwaukee light would do such a number on our night vision that we would end up walking into things. It's sort of an odd circumstance, and not really one that many people are going to run into, so it's not a complaint, just an example of how bright this little guy is.

Oh, and we forgot to mention that it's very durable. We dropped it a few times and it never seemed fazed and when we were at Milwaukee HQ a while back a few guys were practically treating it like a soccer ball and it always kept on shining.

At almost 50 bucks (battery and charger not included) we're sure a lot of you are thinking "I can get a quality light for half that price. And you probably can, but it likely won't be as bright and it definitely won't be compatible with your other 12-volt Milwaukee tools.

At Amazon.com

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (0) | social bookmarking

March 6, 2009

NiteCore and ZebraLight Flashlights

NiteCore.jpgThis is a new low for us. Usually on days where we don't have any time to post something up, we glom onto the work of our fellow tool bloggers or we do a quick youtube search for something like "excavator mishap." But here, we're going to take a reader's comment, add some photos and some links and voila, insta-post!

Reader Joel, who is obviously flashlight obsessed and knows far more about the tools than we do, left this comment on our review of the AltusLumen PAD-L:

ArrowContinue reading: "NiteCore and ZebraLight Flashlights"

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (2) | social bookmarking

February 23, 2009

AltusLumen PAD-L Flashlight - Review

Pad_in_hand.jpgThe AltusLumen PAD-L Flashlight is one that is built with the company's ecologically-friendly mission fully in mind. AltusLumen states that it is the first "sustainable portable LED," that "the main housing is made of recycled and recyclable aluminum and polycarbonate," and finally that the light "is over 75% recyclable at the end of its useful life." This is all fine and good, but if the flashlight doesn't work that well, we're not really going to need to know what parts of it we can recycle, because we simply won't be buying the thing in the first place. That said, when we tested out the AltusLumen it was to see just that: is this a light worth buying? Does it work? Is there anything that sets it above the thousands of other flashlights on the market?

ArrowContinue reading: "AltusLumen PAD-L Flashlight - Review"

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (1) | social bookmarking

December 22, 2008

Power Outage '08 MVPs

power_outage_mvp.jpgAs we've mentioned, we recently spent six days without power. Two of those days (the middle two) were spent elsewhere but we decided to return to the house to keep the wood stove going and to keep an eye on the pipes, hoping that we wouldn't have to go to any major preventative measures such as draining them or fussing with anti-freeze. During the course of the episode, we realized that there are a few items that came in really handy. And when we say, "really handy," what we mean is, "we couldn't have gotten by without them."

The items that achieved MVP status are as follows:

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Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (0) | social bookmarking

October 14, 2008

Leatherman Serac S1, S2, and S3 Flashlights

leatherman_serac.jpgNow that they have attained total dominance of the multi-tool world, Leatherman has set its sights on the house of Maglite with the release of their three new LED flashlights; the Serac S1, the Serac S2, and the Serac S3.

Each light has an aluminum body, with the larger two having stainless steel bezels. The lights range from "fun-size Twix"-sized (S1) to "roll of quarters"-sized (S3). Because of the Leatherman name our guess is that they can take a beating. They look to us like they'd be good in the glove box, the kitchen drawer, the backpack, or the toolbox.

If you want to compare the three lights for yourself, Leatherman has set up this page where you can see all the stats side by side.

But for something this small, they sure aren't cheap. The S1 goes for $25, the S2 $50, and the S3 $70. Pretty expensive for something that weighs 2.6 oz.

Oh, and FYI, according to Dictionary.com a Serac is, "a large irregularity of glacial ice, as a pinnacle found in glacial crevasses and formed by melting or movement of the ice." So if that doesn't make you feel rugged while you're using the light to find your car keys, we don't know what will.

Leatherman Serac S1 at Amazon.com
Leatherman Serac S2 at Amazon.com
Leatherman Serac S3 at Amazon.com

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (0) | social bookmarking

August 28, 2008

Stanley 3-in-1 Tripod Flashlight

stanley_3_in_1_tripod.jpgYou know those creepy photos you can find on the internet, the kind with the frog that wandered too close to the nuclear power plant and now has an extra arm growing out of it's forehead? That's what we think of when we look at Stanley's new 3-in-1 Tripod Flashlight. We've got one of their standard tripod lights and are so used to it that this thing looks like some kind of ghastly genetic mutation. See it there with its freaky little, stunted silver legs and it's three heads all perched up top crowding each other in some Darwinian competition for to be the dominant head?

It's probably a nice light, but it sends a shiver up our spine.

This freakshow costs about $30 and is at Amazon.com

You can also still get the standard tripod light (which reminds us of Wall-E) at Amazon.com

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (2) | social bookmarking

January 10, 2008

Husky 20 Million Rechargeable Spotlight

husky_20_million.jpgHusky has a new big light out on the market and if it's anything like their last one, you should be able to blind orbiting astronauts with it. Their latest portable sun is called the 20 Million (probably in reference to it's freakishly large candlepower) and it looks like it would be a good thing to have in the trunk of your car.

The light uses a replaceable 100 watt Phillips H-4 dual filament bulb. When fully charged, the light lasts about 25 minutes at full power. It comes with 12-volt DC and 120-volt AC adapters so recharging it shouldn't be a problem. Also included is a shoulder strap and a work stand. Since it's made for outdoor use, the 20 Million is weather-resistant.

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Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (10) | social bookmarking

October 31, 2007

Maxxeon Workstar 1200

maxxeon_workstar.jpgMaxxeon, a company that specializes in work lights geared towards auto mechanics and other professionals, offers a little light called the WorkStar 1200.

Its features include a retractable hook; two magnets in the body so you can stick it against the hood of the car while you work; and an interesting head with two swivel points, allowing you to position the light in just about any way imaginable. The light also has a squared off body, so when you're not using the magnets, you'll be able to easily stabilize the light on it's side. The Workstar is cordless and can go for about five hours on a charge.

From the features, it's easy to see that although it would be a great light for a mechanic, it would also be a nice light for anyone in the trades (we're thinking plumbers and electricians), as well as any serious DIYer. It looks like a quality item and, because of that, it's going to cost you quite a bit more than your average work light. The Workstar retails for just under $100 at Amazon and almost $140 if you get it straight from Maxxeon.

For more information, there is a video here.

At Maxxeon and Amazon.com

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (1) | social bookmarking

October 3, 2007

Husky 84-Watt Portable Tripod Fluorescent Work Light - Review

light_compact.jpgHusky has just released a new tripod work light and they were nice enough to let us try out. It's an interesting design, and one we've never seen before.

The light comes folded up, looking sort of like a camera tripod with a very large central shaft. At the end of the shaft is a small light. Once the legs of the tripod are set up, the shaft stands upright with the light on top. When you plug in the light (which is made easy by a nice 12' cord), the light on the top lights up (it's blue). Now, here's where it gets interesting. At this point, you find a little locking tab that you press and once that's done, you can now grab the little blue light and pull the main light out of the central shaft, where it's been nicely protected. Once the light slides up to as high as it will go, it locks into place and automatically turns on. This, we weren't ready for.

ArrowContinue reading: "Husky 84-Watt Portable Tripod Fluorescent Work Light - Review"

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (16) | social bookmarking

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