Sharpening

October 25, 2013

AnySharp Plus Knife Sharpener - Review

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I carry a knife all the time and honestly I'm pretty abusive toward it. I see it as not only a knife, but a screwdriver and pry bar too. It also works as a bottle opener. It's not very surprising that a nice edge doesn't last long. I have a couple of those scraper/sharpeners that are popular and every so often I stop long enough to swipe the knife across them a few times. So it was pretty cool when AnySharp contacted us asking if we wanted to take their AnySharp Plus for a spin.

(See below for a 25% off coupon code at AnySharp.com)

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Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (1) | social bookmarking

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August 4, 2010

AccuSharp Knife Sharpener

accusharp.jpg...And speaking of blade sharpening, does anyone have any insight into why the AccuSharp Knife Sharpener has been at the number one spot on Amazon's Power and Hand Tool bestseller's list for months on end? We actually can't even remember a time when it wasn't at the top of the list. Is this thing heavy in the infomercial circuit or what?

it definitely looks like a nice item to have around, but the overwhelming popularity of it is a bit of a mystery to us.

Drop a line in the comments and let us know your theory on this mystery. We'll send a tool out to either the most likely response or the most paranoid and conspiratorial, we're not sure which. We'll take ideas until next Tuesday 8/10.

AccuSharp Knife Sharpener at Amazon.com

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (7) | social bookmarking

December 23, 2009

3-In-1 No Rust Shield - Review

no_rust_pkg.jpgWhen 3-in-1 sent us one of their No-Rust Shields to test out they had no idea that we would put it in an unwinnable situation, a situation so brutal that there was absolutely no chance for success. We felt that the one way to test this little tool was to break its spirit, totally demoralize it, and then punch it in the face. If you're not familiar with it, the No-Rust Shield is a little gizmo that you put in your tool box or your gang box or your tackle box (or wherever) and it prevents rust from building up on the metal in that space. It's meant for normal day-to-day levels of moisture, not the 98% humidity that we subjected it to. So, we essentially knew that the item was doomed from the start, but we thought the manner in which it let out its dying breath would be indicative of its quality as a tool.

According to 3-In-1, the No-Rust Shield (NRS) works by (we're not joking here) sending out "metal-seeking vapor phase corrosion inhibitors" which form a layer of protection around whatever metal it is that you're trying to protect. Sort of like midi-chlorians of the tool world.

For our test, we took two Ziploc bags and put about 1/2 cup of water in each. We then put a handful of nails in each bag and in one bag we placed the No-Rust Shield (NRS). We closed up the bags and positioned them in a way that neither the nails or the NRS was exposed to direct water. That was about two months ago.

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We watched the test diligently for about two weeks. At that point, the control nails were fully engaged with rust and the NRS nails were just starting to show signs of falling victim themselves. We had big plans of taking a ton of photos of the progression, but it was at that point that (honesty alert) we completely forgot about our test. And then we were driving home from work the other day and, "isn't there something I should be remembering now....oh yeah." So we revisited the corner of the shop with the bags and at first glance, it looked like the NRS had completely succumbed to the rust and the game was up, but upon closer inspection, there were still patches of untouched metal on the NRS nails. Very interesting. We pulled the nails out and took some photos.

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The water was now rusty in both bags, so we filtered it out and dried the results. We took some photos of that too. So, as you can see, there is a difference in the results. The NRS works. Not under impossible conditions, but it does work. If our results were translated into a box of nails or a box of router bits, we're convinced that the items would stay rust free. Or at least rust free for the 90 days that the NRS lasts for. Thankfully, the NRS also has a strip that turns red to indicate that when it's time to get a new one.

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Honestly, our test was barbaric to the No-Rust Shield. We created a situation that is so unlikely and so brutal that it would really never be a real-life situation. If you're someone who is going to take the time and effort to purchase a No-Rust Shield, you're not going to be the type to store your tools in a bucket of water. But even with the punishing test, the No-Rust Shield displayed its effectiveness by putting up a good fight, even if it ultimately shared the fate of Tennyson's Light Brigade.

The No-Rust Shield goes for about $5 and is available at Amazon.com

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (1) | social bookmarking

July 7, 2009

Rockwell LogJaws (JawHorse Accessory) - Review

logjaws.jpgAt first glance, we thought the LogJaws were about the silliest thing we'd ever seen. We're huge fans of the JawHorse, and use it all the time, but who would really need to clamp a log at waist height? Definitely not us, and we heat with wood.

To use the LogJaws, you first have to invest in the Rockwell JawHorse, which we think is a good idea no matter who you are. So if you don't have one and you're interested, our review of that tool is here. But simply put, the JawHorse is a workstation centered around a large clamping jaw and Rockwell makes a number of add-ons for the unit, including these, the LogJaws.

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What the LogJaws do is give the JawHorse the ability to clamp a log or really any other oddly shaped item that's going to have problems in the parallel clamps that come standard with the JawHorse. The LogJaws sit higher than the regular clamps and have these mean looking teeth that are perfect for sinking into a nice chunk of rotted oak. The LogJaws attach very easily to the JawHorse, just a few screws and it's done. Maybe two minutes max.

We discovered quickly that the LogJaws really are great for clamping cut logs, branches and other bits of tree debris. But where exactly do you go from there? What sorts of things can you use it for? The JawHorse sits too high to use it for your utility, "need to fill the woodshed before the first snow" log cutting. We just don't think it's worth it to haul one end of a 100 lb log into the jaws just so you can cut 18" off of it and then have to reposition the whole thing. But if you're only going to be cutting smaller branches and kindling, then it'll work great. We actually see the LogJaws as more for the wood carving/woodworking crowd. And in fact, we used it to make some nice tree limb coasters (directions here).

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The LogJaws also have these little brackets that flip out and allow you to clamp your chainsaw bar so you can easily sharpen your chainsaw, saving valuable knuckle skin.

In a way, the LogJaws sum up the glory of the JawHorse; you can get the basic unit, which is extremely useful, and then you have the ability to customize it, in order to suit your niche needs. The LogJaws aren't for everybody, but if you're one of the people who it is for, you'll love it.

The LogJaws cost about $40 which puts them on the lower side of things when compared to most of the other JawHorse accessories.

As an aside, if you are a wood carver, we suggest checking out our reviews of the Arbortech wood carving tools, the Mini-Grinder and the Power Chisel.

At Amazon.com

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (1) | social bookmarking

July 12, 2007

The Drill Doctor

drill_doctor.jpgIf you’re like us and you never throw anything away, then you’ve probably got a few coffee cans of old drill bits stashed on some shelf in the workshop. If that’s the case, then it might be worthwhile to invest in a Drill Doctor. The Drill Doctor is a bench top drill sharpening device and it looks like it turns the tedious task of bit sharpening into an easy two step process. From time to time, we go through and sharpen our bits with an angle grinder, but the results are on the pathetic side and never really last that long. According to their website, the Drill Doctor is capable of making any drill bit (even broken ones), as good or better than they were the day the came out of the package.

We’d go into detail about how it does it, but if you’re interested, it would be easier to go straight to the source and check out the Drill Doctor movie.

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Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (0) | social bookmarking


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