October 13, 2010

RotoZip ZipSaw Multipurpose Cut-Off Saw


RotoZip is on the verge of releasing something called the ZipSaw which seems to walk the line between a 'grinder' and, well, a 'grinder.' It looks like a good one-stop tool for a tile installer, but it's likely that anyone could find plenty for it to do.

It really is just a grinder with a slightly modified body shape, optimized for cutting rather than grinding. So the difference is an ergonomic one. It has the same detachable side handle as a grinder and the same power (7amps - there are plenty of grinders that get up into the 12-13 amp range, but they're built for hours of metal grinding, not tile work like this tool).


When equipped with a RotoZip XWheel, the ZipSaw is capable of a flush cut, which is a nice feature. Because there are XWheels available that can cut metal, tile, and wood, this looks like the ZipSaw could be good tool to have around, especially for a bathroom or kitchen remodel. The dust collection system makes it even more appealing. We've never had any issues with our RotoZip and in fact, we're constantly impressed with its durability, which gives us high hopes for the ZipSaw.

The tool, a couple wheels, and a dust collection kit will be sold for $100.

Due in stores on November 8th.

Press release is after the jump...

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Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (0) | social bookmarking

October 6, 2010

Bosch Axial Glide Video

This is a nice close-up look at the new Bosch miter saw. Motion-Picture-Preview-Man's voice gets pretty annoying after a while (unbearable really), but with the volume low, you can take in a lot of good info on the saw. The beginning of the video is particularly cool.

It still boggles the mind that Bosch will be selling this at the same price point as their current rail miter saw. We have more thoughts on the new tool here. But anyway, here's the video...

...In a world....

At Amazon.com

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (1) | social bookmarking

September 28, 2010

Ryobi RLS1351 Portable Flooring Saw

ryobi_laminate_saw.jpgLooks like the Skil Flooring Saw now has some competition from Ryobi. The Ryobi Flooring Saw is a pretty similar item with all of the same basic features; rip cuts, crosscuts, lightweight, and decent dust collection.

Comparing the saws side-by-side, the Skil seems to have an advantage in functionality with better cutting ability (at a 45 degree miter, the Skil can cut 8-1/2" and the Ryobi can cut 8" and at 0 miter the Skil can make an 18" cut and the Ryobi an 11" cut). The Ryobi claims, 'best in class' dust collection, but we're not sure exactly how that's quantified.

There are also some odd discrepancies between the Ryobi site and the Home Depot site (where the Ryobi saw is exclusively available). First, HD calls the saw the 'Ryobi Laminate Saw,' which is only annoying because it meant we had to spent an entire three minutes looking for it. Secondly, HD says the tool weight is 23 lbs and Ryobi says 18 lbs. The Skil is 25 lbs, so either way the Ryobi is lighter, but still, what's up with the two different numbers? It's likely that HD means 'package weight,' even though they put the number as the 'tool weight.' If we didn't make so many typos ourselves, we'd call that, 'some sloppy internet work.'

At $150, it's the same price as the Skil as well.

At Home Depot

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (0) | social bookmarking

September 24, 2010

Bosch PS41-2A 12-Volt Max Lithium-Ion Impact Driver - Review

Are you sick of us talking about Bosch's 12-volt drill/drivers yet? Well, if you're not, then you'll be happy to know that they sent us one of their new 12-volt impact driver to review. We've previously covered both the driver and the drill/driver in this second generation of li-ion madness and found them both to be exceptionally powerful. And the verdict on the impact driver is....

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Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (1) | social bookmarking

September 20, 2010

Wheeler-Rex Mantis Band Saw

For some reason, when we first saw the picture, we thought the Wheeler-Rex Mantis was a little homeowner band saw that wouldn't look out of place sitting on a garage workbench. Then we saw the video and realized how big it is (it actually has attached wheels so it can be pulled around like luggage). As it turns out, it's a 110 lb, $2,500 piece of heavy-duty, industrial grade plumbing equipment.

It can handle up to 6" pipe and is available with a flat vise or a chain vise. The body can flip up and be used as a vertical band saw.

Check out the video:

At Underbid

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (0) | social bookmarking

September 16, 2010

Dremel 6800-01 Trio - Review

dremel_trio_1.jpgDremel recently released a funky looking tool called the Trio (and were nice enough to send us one to review). In the great Venn diagram of power tool abilities, it seems to overlap with 'rotary tool,' 'router,' and 'RotoZip (aka spiral saw).' We're generally wary of tools that try to do too much (seems like they usually end up doing not too much of anything) but because of our very high regard for Dremel, we had hope and were looking forward to digging into the Trio.

As it turns out we found some good and some bad. Unfortunately, more of the latter than the former...

we heard from Dremel and as it turns out, we were using the Trio in an incorrect manner. We've updated the review with some clarifications. Amazing, eh? We write a post about tool safety and then rip this thing out of the box and start using it without reading the instructions...."

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Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (7) | social bookmarking

September 3, 2010

DeWalt DWP611 Compact Router

dewalt_router.jpg dewalt_router2.jpg
DeWalt has just announced the release of a new compact router which appears to sit the fence between 'laminate trimmer' and 'router.' It's got that Bosch Colt vibe, but with a 1-1/4 hp motor it's more powerful (the Colt has 1hp) and with the plunge base, more versatile.

We really like the looks of this one. The Colt has been our go-to router for years. As a day to-day-carpenter, there is rarely a need for a full-sized router. We're usually just doing a sill bullnose or a casing bead, nothing too big. So looking over the press release, there are a few things that stand out as features that set this one apart from the competition. The first is an LED set-up that illuminates the workpiece. We scoffed at LEDs when they first started showing up on drills, but now we're full-on Kool-Aid drinkers on the things. The second feature is the plunge base. Having the plunge ability on a small router is a great idea and this seems to be a first for that.

The fixed base model is going to retail for about $140 which is $25 more than the similar Colt kit. The full kit with the plunge base will go for $200.

The press release is after the jump...

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Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (0) | social bookmarking

August 17, 2010

Crain 812H 13 Amp SuperSaw

crain_supersaw.jpgQ: How do you make a router even more dangerous than it already is?

A: Put a 6-1/2" saw blade on it.

And that's sort of what the geniuses at Crain have done with their undercut saw. It's a tool that is meant to assist with all kinds of flooring (tile, carpet, wood, etc.), but from the looks of it, we think it's meant more for general ass-kicking.

So if you're putting a carpet down over a nice heart pine wood floor, you can use this tool to trim the bottoms of the doors as well as the jambs and baseboard for a nicer look. It's really a specialty tool, but it's nice to know that it's out there. It's the kind of thing that you'd never think of using, but if you're taking on a massive re-flooring project at your house, it may be cost effective to get one.

The tool has a 1-1/4" depth adjustment (from flush to 1-1/4") and it's able to fully undercut an inside corner which is a nice feature.

The SuperSaw sells for $340 and is at Amazon.com

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (1) | social bookmarking

July 26, 2010

Milwaukee 2010 Product Symposium


The reason we were so light on posts last week is that we were lucky enough to be at Milwaukee's annual Product Symposium. While there, we ate some great food, hung out with a solid group of our tool-writer pals, enjoyed a lot of great conversations with the Milwaukee crowd, and most importantly had the opportunity to get a look at this year's line of new tools.

The nitty-gritty of the event has been covered by a few of our fellow compatriots here and here, so we're going to stick to just a few thoughts on some of the new items that we saw...

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Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (2) | social bookmarking

July 16, 2010

Dremel 6800 Trio

dremel_trio.jpgIt's amazing what a handle can do.

When you boil the Dremel Trio down to it's mechanics, it's a rotary tool, just like the million-and-a half other rotary tools that Dremel has released over the years. But when you get creative with the handle (and in this case we would say, 'very creative'), all of a sudden you have not only a standard rotary tool but a mini-router as well, and sort of a jig saw, and kind of a RotoZip and maybe this and a bit of that. It's kind of tricky to wrap the head around this little item with it's pivoting handle and its plunge-cutting ability.

dremel_trio2_jpgWell, actually it's not that little. At least not as little as we thought. We played around with one at Home Depot and the body is actually 'softball-sized' where, from the picture, we were thinking more along the lines of 'baseball.' This size has allowed Dremel to stuff in a 2 amp motor, which makes the Trio more powerful than any of their rotary tools to date (the Dremel 4000 has a 1.6 amp motor).

We see the Trio being useful to the woodworker and hobbyist, particularly with the plunge-cutting ability. We have our reservations on bit-life though. If you've ever used a Roto-Zip, you know that embedding a spiral blade in wood and scrolling around with it equals a severely short bit life. Dremel may have addressed this, as we noticed a disclaimer on the Dremel site saying that the Trio is not compatible with standard rotary tool accessories. Sounds like they've made a more durable set with the Trio in mind.

The Trio is currently available at Home Depot and Amazon.com (only pre-order at Amazon though, with a release date of Sept 15th...wonder what it took for HD to get first dibs?)

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (0) | social bookmarking

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