August 13, 2010

Stanley FaxMax Xtreme Reversible Nail Set

fatmax_nailset.jpgOur deal with nail sets is that we'll go and buy the standard Stanley 3-piece combo kit (you know, the red one the yellow one, and the gray one), and then after about two months, we can only find the gray one. We have no idea what the hell happens to the other two, but it's happened enough times that there's something a little strange about it. True, nail sets are small items. True, they often get passed from carpenter to painter and back to carpenter. But we've never lost anything with the frequency of our nail set.

We've thought about this quite a bit (way too much actually) and decided that maybe fate says we can only handle one nail set at a time and that we lose the others due to some kind of freaky, we're-on-the-island-from-Lost black cloud that lives in our peripheral vision. So possibly our answer may sit with the new FatMax Reversible Nail Set. This nice looking 2-in-1 item houses a 1/32" and 2/32" nail set (the sizes we keep losing), and it looks like changing sizes is as easy as pulling the set out, flipping it over, and setting it back in.

The reversible FatMax costs about $10, which is $2.50 more than the standard 3-piece kit. If we don't lose it in the first couple weeks, it's worth the extra dough.

At Amazon.com

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (0) | social bookmarking

Hyde 10-in-1 Multi-Tool

hyde_multitool.pngWe agree with our pal Mark Clement that the 5-in-1 (or 6-in-1) is one of the most useful tools that a guy can own. When we're on a site, ours spends a lot of time in our back pocket and does duty as a scraper, a pry bar, a chisel, a blade, a little hammer, and whatever else we need done. We also like that it looks like a Klingon weapon.

So we just stumbled across the Hyde 10-in-1, which has apparently been out for a couple years, and adds some functionality to the fantastic little tool. The big trick of the new 10-in-1 is that it comes with four screwdriver bits that can click into the rear of the handle. You're probably reading this thinking, 'who cares, I'll just use my regular screwdriver." But to a painter doing prep, this could be a real time saver, especially for removing switch plates and outlet covers.

It looks like there is some kind of on-board bit storage that flips out of the handle. Otherwise it's the same old 5-in-1.

The 10-in-1 costs $6, which is strange because Hyde's 6-in-1 goes for $8-$10. Huh?

At Amazon.com

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (0) | social bookmarking

August 12, 2010

Rockwell JawStand

rockwell_jawstand.jpg

There is no question that the JawHorse has been a big success for Rockwell. We use ours in some fashion just about every day. It's been such a hit that earlier this year Ridgid even put a horse in the race with something called the SuperClamp. But if you've been paying close attention, you'd know that the original design came, not from Rockwell, but from an Australian company called Triton. Rockwell took a tool called the Triton SuperJaws, cleaned up the design and, with the release of a slew of innovative attachments (plywood jaws, log jaws, welding station, etc) transformed the clamping tool into a complete workstation system.

Well, if the concept worked for one tool, why not try it again? We just got word that Rockwell is going back to the Aussie well with the release of a new item called the Triton Multistand JawStand. Again, Rockwell has polished up the original design and added a number of nice looking features.

The general functionality of the JawStand sits somewhere between that of an out-feed stand, a sawhorse, and Juan, your apprentice who is always late for work and stands there and holds things for you.

There's a jaw on it, but as you can see from the image, it's more about stabilizing a door than crushing a watermelon (one of our favorite JawHorse pastimes). The top of the clamping area has some kind of glide material on it which allows for easy action as a table saw/miter saw out-feed. The stand can be adjusted in height from 25" to 41" and the top can pivot. To track these two movements, the stem of the tool has height measurements on it and the head has a built in level vial. The whole things folds up for easy transport and storage.

Just from looking at the image and reading the press release, this looks like a good tool to have around, especially if you're someone who spends a lot of time working alone. The only curiosity to us is that the clamp area has a maximum width of 1-1/4" which seems strange. You'd think that it would be able to at least hold a 2x4(UPDATE: The jaw actually opens to 1-3/4" and not 1-1/4" as the press release states. This makes much more sense).

The JawStand will be retailing for about $60. It's currently available at Sears and it will likely show up at Amazon.com and Rockwell Tools Direct.

The press release with more detailed info is after the jump.

ArrowContinue reading: "Rockwell JawStand"

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (2) | social bookmarking

August 3, 2010

Irwin GrooveLock Pliers

Irwin has just released two new jaw designs in their GrooveLock series. Prior to this, there was only the v-jaws version available (pictured, left). The new designs (straight jaws and smooth jaws) are alterations with the 'teeth' of the tool and nothing else.


groovelock1.jpg groovelock2.jpg groovelock3.jpg

So it all comes down to what it is you're going to be clamping. If it's regular old nuts, stick with the v-jaw. If it's something a little more delicate, something you can't mar, then look into the smooth jaws. If you're grabbing at an item with parallel edges, the straight jaws are the ticket.

There's actually more to these tools than the new variety to the business end. With the initial release of the v-jaws a couple years back, Irwin's GrooveLock system bypassed the normal adjustment aggravation associated with standard tongue and groove pliers and made a system where you just press a button and slide the jaw where you want it and lock it in place. According to Irwin, this process is twice as fast as the traditional method.

The new designs aren't at Amazon yet, but the v-jaws are here.

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (0) | social bookmarking

July 13, 2010

Johnson Glo-View Magnetic Torpedo Level - Review

johnson_glo_level_side.jpgLast week we reviewed Swason's new Lightning Level which turned out to be a pretty nice tool. Just press a button and the vials light up. That one is available in 24" and 48" lengths, which in our opinion are two of the three essential level sizes. But what about the third, the torpedo level? They're too small to house batteries and a torpedo level with LEDs seems a bit like overkill. So do these little levels stay sadly unlit?

Not so says Johnson Level and Tool with the release of their new Glo-View Torpedo Level. This one doesn't have any LEDs to light up the vials, but rather it...wait for it...wait for it...wait for it...glows! Whoa.

johnson_glo_level_dark.jpgLike most torpedoes, the Glo-View has three vials; a level, a plumb, and a 45 degree. It has an aluminum housing and one of the long sides has a v-groove to make it easier to hold it against a pipe. The other side has three magnets on it so you can stick it to a metal stud or whatever. We're not going to get into our thoughts on magnetized levels again, but if you're interested, we spent a paragraph on it here.

The glow feature is nice and subtle. In fact, if someone just handed you the level during the day, it's likely you wouldn't even realize the level had any special ability. The glowing things works like any glow-in-the-dark toy you had when you were little; hold it by the light and let it charge up, and then you've got enough glow-mojo (glojo?) to last you a little while, at least long enough to worm your way into the crawlspace and solder a few pipes.

johnson_glo_level_top.jpgjohnson_glo_level_bottom.jpg

The Glo-View Torpedo runs for just over $15, which puts it in right in the mid-range for torpedo levels, so it's not like you're paying an extra $30 for the glowing ability.

Johnson has incorporated their Glo-View into their line of box levels, so the feature is available 24", 48", 72", and 96" lengths as well. It's a good alternative to the Swanson LED levels if you're interested in having the vials lit, but you're still a little dodgy about having a level with a light switch on it.

At Grainger

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (0) | social bookmarking

July 12, 2010

Channellock Unveils a New Website

channellock_logo.jpgChannellock, makers many fine pliers and wrenches, have just sent out word that they've completely redesigned their website. We remember the old one and can only say that the new one is a VAST improvement. Not only is it easy to navigate with all the right tool information, but they also have a virtual tour of the Channellock factory which has to be one of the cooler things we've ever seen on a tool company website.

Check out the site here or go straight to the factory tour here.

Channellock tools Amazon.com

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (0) | social bookmarking

July 9, 2010

Swanson Lightning Level - Review

swanson_lightning_level.jpgPrevious to them sending us their new Lightning Level to review, the only contact we had ever had from Swanson was the legal document that their lawyers dropped on us demanding that we stop using the term 'Speed Square' in a generic sense. As it turns out, the only acceptable way to refer to the tool is by saying in its entirety: "SPEEDĀ® Square, a registered trademark of Swanson Tool Co., Inc." so if you see anyone else out there who doesn't take the time to write out that entire ridiculous statement, please contact Swanson and let them know that there's some serious trademark violation going on. The whole episode was very irritating and entirely unnecessary...they could have just asked. We hope that those lawyers charged them a lot of money. Due to their heavy-handed approach to the matter, we decided we would rather drink wood glue than aid in the publicity of any of their tools. We created a blacklist and we put them on it. It was the least we could do. We're deeply Irish and capable of holding a mega-grudge.

swanson_lightning_logo.jpgBut, our policy is to review everything that shows up on the doorstep, so we suppressed the battle-axe wielding tribal Irish chieftain who lives in our head (he's in charge of long-term animosities), and carried on with the review of the Swanson's Lightning Level.

So what exactly is it? Well, it's a level with a little LED light at each vial. To operate it, just press the button that is at one end of the level and the lights go on. Press it again and they go off. If you forget to press it again, it goes off by itself in ten minutes.

The level has two plumb vials and one level vial, rubber bumpers at each end (and, at one end, the dual AAA battery compartment), and rubber grips. Both edges have v-grooves for things like pipes and on the model we tested, one side (the side uninterrupted by the level vial), is magnetized.

swanson_lightning_end_off.jpg swanson_lightning_end_on.jpg

Thankfully, Swanson has a non-magnetized version available. We sit the fence on the whole magnetic level thing. While there are circumstances when it comes in handy, most of the time we find it to be a nuisance. Once the magnets collect a few metal shavings, which is inevitable, they become VERY dangerous to finished surfaces. It seems to be a matter of personal preference, and ours is to usually pass on them.

swanson_lightning_on.jpgAnd what do we think about the lighted vials? We actually like them and Swanson did a nice execution with the tool. Thankfully, it's not a level with some additional contraption built off the side that lights the vials up, but rather it's a cleanly integrated system. It's not like you feel compelled to always use the lights, but they're there if you need them. It's a level that happens to have lights, not lights that happen to have a level.

And we found the feature to be useful in all the usual places; closets, basements, and job sites (especially when you're only relying on a string of junky temp lights). We also feel the need to note that the pictures we took don't accurately represent the lights. In reality, it's a nice soft glow that lights up the vial, not the Tron special effect that our camera is capable of showing.

So is it a necessary feature that should be included on all levels? We don't think so. Is it handy to have from time to time? Definitely.

The Lightning Level is available in both 24" and 48" lengths and goes for about $45 and $65 respectively (add about $10 for the magnetized version).

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (2) | social bookmarking

June 15, 2010

Derby and Ball Scythe - Review

scythe_1.jpgWith the field out by the apple tree starting to get a bit overgrown and with FOTS (Father of Tool Snob) informing us that we'd better get to doing something about it before it goes to seed (he's in the know on this sort of thing), we decided we'd fire up a string trimmer to deal with the tall grass.

The long, overgrown grass (complete with thick weeds) seemed to be a good match for the heavy duty 4-stroke LEHR string Trimmer (we have the Craftsman branded one, but it's the same tool). After about ten minutes of relentless starter-cord pulling, we had nothing. So we pulled some more, and then some more after that. This coming from a tool that touts: no winterization and an easy start-up every time. We began to see that unique shade of white rage that accompanies uncooperative lawn machinery. We tried the 2-stroke trimmer that we have and that one was no better. No starting, no nothing. We went back to the LEHR and got another ten minutes of anger.

We were actually in the process of putting the trimmer in the log splitter when we recalled that the house came with an old scythe tucked in the back of the shed. After a few satisfying kicks to the trimmer, we went and dug it up also locating our box of sharpening stones.

scythe_blade.jpgAfter a pass with the angle grinder and a fine tune with the stones, the scythe was pretty damn sharp (a slip with the sharpening stone almost took a finger off, giving us a nice way to test SallyeAnder's claim that their hand soap works on bloodstains). Never having used a scythe before, but having once gotten a lesson from FOTS, we headed out to the field.

A few things to note about the remainder of the morning...

1. The scythe worked great. It's nice rhythmic work that quickly puts you smack dab in your 'happy place.' With no annoying trimmer motor or uncomfortable earplugs, we were relaxed and somewhat hypnotized by the satisfying swishing noise made by the cutting. The neighbors were probably pleased as well to not hear the high-pitched, 10lb mosquito whining of the trimmer motor.

2. We lasted about an hour, but after that we were toast. It's exhausting work. It's sort of like using a post-hole digger in that it seems to rely on muscles that you didn't know you even had. Our technique was OK, but not that great. We're going to have to work on it next time.

scythe_lable.jpg3. And there will be a next time. The trimmer would have been much less effort with the only energy burned being done by moving the shaft around. But the scythe gave us the whole package; we not only got a workout, but were engaged with the process, tweaking a grip, shifting our weight, trying to figure out the best way to work the tool. Above everything, we simply enjoyed ourselves. With no motor, we were able to hear the birds and the wind and all those other little noises that you miss in the muted cone of semi-silence that earplugs provide. The scythe was also able to handle some weeds that the trimmers would have likely had some problems with.

Needless to say, there was no stopping to load another string on the trimmer, no re-gassing, and no engine troubles. The only engine was us (with a pathetically small gas tank, by the way).

4. We also got to thinking about the time when people would spend entire days, no weeks, doing this work. It was one of those, 'we're a nation of sissies' moment, and while we were gasping for air around minute 55, we were in awe of the men who cut hay by hand.

5. If you've got a similar situation going on and there's a part of your property that gets overgrown and you only want to hack it down once or twice a year, we recommend getting a scythe and giving it a go. At the very least, it will give you a deep appreciation of your rural grandfathers. And probably a sore muscle or two.

Here's one at Amazon.com (looks like you have to buy the handle and blade separately). We also some on ebay, but if you start trolling barn sales, you'll probably have a good chance of finding one.

And a video on proper technique:

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (4) | social bookmarking

June 11, 2010

Milwaukee Releases More Hand Tools

milwaukee_compact_hacksaw.jpgIt looks like Milwaukee is ready for round two of their new line of hand tools. We covered the initial release here and reviewed their 11-in-1 Screwdriver here.The new gaggle includes a screwdriver set, a folding jab saw (very cool), a PVC hand saw, and the one we like the best, a compact hack saw.

From the pictures we've seen, the tools all have the markings of well-made items; solid looks and nice grips. Where applicable (like on the hack saw) there are features like tool-free blade changes. As with all of Milwaukee's tools, these are all built for the tradesman and if our 11-in-1 Screwdriver is any indication (it's still glued to our hip), all of these new tools are going to be worthy purchases if you're looking for something that's going to be with you for a while.

Press release after the jump.

ArrowContinue reading: "Milwaukee Releases More Hand Tools"

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (1) | social bookmarking

May 25, 2010

10% Off Father's Day Gift Set at Channellock

VJ-1.gifIf you've been paying attention, last week we ran a contest giving away a nice set of Channellocks. We picked a winner (some dude named Jeff), so if you're one of the millions of people who didn't win, all is not lost! Channellock has been cool enough to pass on a coupon code for 10% off the prize gift set. The code is CP3Q1. Just enter that at check-out (at the Channellock Website), and you should be all set. More information on the set is here.

Again, the coupon code is CP3Q1 and it's valid at the Channellocks website until Father's Day.

A big thanks to Channellock for helping out with the giveaway and for supplying you, our readers, with the coupon.

Check out the gift set here.

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (0) | social bookmarking

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