Glues and Adhesives

February 14, 2013

Prolong SPL100 - Review

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So Prolong has a product called SPL100 which is made with something they call AMFT (Anti-Friction Metal Treatment). At first glance, it seems like a WD40 type lube, something you could spray on just about anything to make it better. The Prolong website says that it can...

lubricate, penetrate, and prevent corrosion, free sticky mechanisms, displace moisture, stop squeaks, and reduce friction and wear on all metal surfaces. It cleans and protects metal surfaces, tools or any metal equipment exposed to water or weather.

Prolong sent us a few cans and spray bottles of the stuff to try out. We've used it in a number of applications, one in particular had an interesting result.

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Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (1) | social bookmarking

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April 30, 2012

StirWhip - Review

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This is one of those odd little tools that has been floating around the shop for some time now. Prazi sent us one a looong time ago (probably close to a year, yikes), and we've used it off and on since then. We've always liked it, but it wasn't until our recent tile-a-palooza that we really got into the StirWhip way of life. Over the course of about two weeks, we tiled two bathroom floors and a tub surround. That was a month ago and now we're starting another bathroom and we realized it's well past time we spread the word on this valuable little item.

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Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (1) | social bookmarking

April 4, 2012

Goo Gone Pro Power - Review

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So a while back (over six months....) we were contacted by the peeps at Goo Gone. They said, "yo, we're gonna send you something smeared with some nasty goo and along with it, we'll include a bottle of Goo Gone so you can clean up the mess and keep whatever is is we're sending you." (note: heavy paraphrasing going in). We said, "yo, honestly, don't bother, we've been meaning to write about your great product for years, we'll just write about our previous experiences with it." Then they said, "yo, this is already in the works, you got some of our product coming your way." At which point we said, "yo, thanks!"

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Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (0) | social bookmarking

June 9, 2011

Gorilla Wood Glue - Review

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It takes quite a bit for someone to switch wood glue brands. We're in the Titebond II camp and always have been. It's just what we've always used, and that's that. Gorilla, seeking to change our minds sent us a couple bottles of their Gorilla Wood Glue to test out. So half way through a shelving project, we took the the plunge. We tucked the Titebond away and gave the new guy a shot.

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Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (5) | social bookmarking

June 3, 2011

Gorilla Tape - Tough and Wide - Review

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Gorilla, masters of all things sticky, sent us some of their Tough and Wide Gorilla Tape to check out and check out we did. We've been fans of their Gorilla Tape for a couple years now, ever since someone brought a roll to the jobsite and we all got a front row seat at how strong it is (it's very, very strong), but we weren't exactly sure how we'd use the extra wide roll...

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Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (0) | social bookmarking

March 24, 2011

Scotch Tough Duct Tape - Special Forces Unit

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Yes, we all know that duct tape is one of the essentials. Blah, blah, blah, it's like the Force from Star Wars....blah, blah, it has a light side, a dark side, and it holds the universe together...we know...we know...please, stop with the quirky little fortune cookie sayings about duct tape. So anyway, beyond all that, Scotch has recently released a bunch of new types of duct tape, each for a particular use. Some of them pretty cool. Hopefully they won't spawn more annoying sayings about duct tape...

From our friends at Scotch:


Scotch® Tough Duct Tape - Heavy Duty All-Weather
is designed for long-term or permanent exterior repairs and resists drying, cracking and peeling caused by tough outdoor elements like cold and moisture - making it ideal for tough outdoor repairs in extreme conditions. Use it to:
  • Repair outdoor items
  • Secure plastic coverings to outdoor furniture for protection during the winter months

Scotch® Tough Duct Tape - Extreme Hold features rugged woven material and a double-thick adhesive layer - making it ideal for demanding repairs. Its waterproof barrier helps it adhere securely under the most extreme winter weather conditions for tough projects and repairs. Use it to:


  • Bundle loads of wood during the winter months

Scotch® Tough Duct Tape - Outdoor Painter's Clean Removal sticks to rough surfaces like brick and stucco. It features a waterproof backing and removes cleanly for up to 14 days from most surfaces. Use it to:

  • Moisture-proof doors & windows
  • Seal a variety of exterior surfaces during the winter months - including glass, vinyl, metal, concrete and finished wood

The one we're most interested in is the Heavy-Duty All-Weather. Do you think it's possible to wrap our entire house in it? Might take a while, but if it prevents ice dam leakage, it could be worth it...

More information at Scotch and a big selection is available at Amazon.com

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (3) | social bookmarking

December 8, 2010

Duo-Fast Jet-Tac Tack Strip Epoxy

DF_Jet_Tac.jpgWe're pretty sure that if Hell has carpeting, it's not really carpeting at all, but wall-to-wall tack strips. We can't think of a more insidious building product than the tack strip (possibly Ice & Water Shield on a hot day). These terrible pieces of nail embedded wood, which are used to hold carpeting in place, are better suited as torture devices or as Christmas presents to disobedient children. They destroy gloves, rip clothing, and turn any trash bag into a piece of shredded plastic.

So we're not sure how to take the news that Duo-Fast has just released a new high-powered, two-part epoxy to adhere these horrible strips down. We think it comes down to a net positive for the consumer and a net negative for the DIYer who doesn't like wall to wall carpeting.

When we detach ourselves and think of things from the consumer/installer angle there is a lot to be said for the new adhesive. First, it comes in a 10oz tube that fits a standard caulking gun. Second, it sets up in 5-7 minutes and does a complete cure in 2 hours. Third, because it's so powerful, you'll only need to dab it on in a few places, meaning less product lasting longer.

But as for ripping the strips up. That's probably another story...and one that we'd rather not think about right now.

Press release with more details after the jump

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Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (3) | social bookmarking

October 19, 2010

Autumn Migration

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As the leaves start changing here in the Northeast, we often are lucky enough to hear the sounds of the geese heading south to warmer places. It's a wonderful noise and if you've never heard or seen a flock heading south, you're missing out. It's the true, and most poignant, mark of summer's end.

On top of all the maudlin prose it makes us eject, the noise of the geese is also our annual reminder that it's time for another, possibly more important migration. This one isn't made by any breed of animal, but rather our crates of glues, caulks, and epoxies. Theirs is a treacherous journey from the oftentimes not heated garage workshop to the basement paint shelves where they will remain unfrozen for another winter.

So don't forget to tend to your glues and other freezable liquids as things get colder. We have first hand knowledge that it's no fun to find a frozen bottle of Titebond II in the middle of January.

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (0) | social bookmarking

September 14, 2010

DAP EnergySaver High Performance Air Leak & Gap Sealant - Review

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A while back, DAP sent us a tube of their new EnergySaver Air Leak & Gap Sealant. It's been sitting on the desk for a while because, well, who cares about sealing their house in the middle of July? Not us, we've got mowing to do. But the seasons do change and here we are. So last week we cut open the tube, prepped a few window casings, and checked out the label to see if there are any specific instructions that go along with the product. Which is exactly where problems started...

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Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (1) | social bookmarking

August 9, 2010

Scotch 'How Tough is your Tape?" Contest

scotch_duct_tape.jpgWe've always been of the opinion that 98% of our problems can be solved with Duct Tape and/or a length of bailing twine. Scotch, the makers of Tough Duct Tape seem to think that there are a lot of you out there with that same old Yankee mentality. And right now, the further down the duct tape rabbit hole you are, the greater the chance of you winning the grand prize in their "How Tough is your Tape?" contest.

Scotch is looking for pictures of all of the insane ways you use their duct tape, from holding together the tractor engine block to supporting the half-broken tree limb that hangs over your house.

The grand prize winner will get a trip for two to Vegas to hob-nob with some NASCAR folks. There are also some cash prizes for the silver and bronze medalists.

If you're looking for contest inspiration, go here.

More information here.

Scotch Tough Tape at Amazon.com

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (0) | social bookmarking

April 8, 2010

Liquid Wrench Lubes - Review

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A while back, we reviewed the new Blue Works lubricating products from the guys who brought us WD-40. We casually used them around the shop and thought they were great. As it turns out Liquid Wrench has also just released a new set of lubes and they shipped a six-pack our way so that we could get a look. We treated them the same as the Blue Works...plopped them on a shelf and used them as needed.

The new products are; lubricating oil, penetrating oil, silicone spray. dry lubricant, chain lube, and white lithium grease. Pretty much anything that a guy could ask for.

Like we said in our review of the Blue Works products, we're not Tools of the Trade, so we don't have the time or resources to set up some elaborate test where we identically rust two sets of nuts and bolts and then saturate them in two different penetrants, and then have some way of measuring the torque needed to loosen each one. No, we try to base our reviews on what 'the guy in his garage' is looking for. And in this case, the question he wants answered is, 'do they work?" We found that after cleaning up the gears of our table saw, fixing a squeaky shed door hinge, and unsticking a bad drawer slide, the answer is yes. "Did we like them?" Yes. "If we saw them in a store, would we buy them?" Yes. And honestly, the same could be said for the Blue Works products. We have no idea what the chemical difference between these two brands is, and we really don't care. And we don't think that you really do either. If you're like us, you're going to be in a store looking for a few things and you're going to think to yourself, "oh yeah, I need some spray silicone for that window that keeps sticking." You just want something that works. And the Liquid Wrench products work.

Actually, one interesting thing about the Liquid Wrench products is the marketing. Where Blue Works takes a technical attitude and have loaded their website with stats and numbers, Liquid Wrench approaches things in a more user friendly way and concentrates on educating you about the practical uses of each lube. Their website is great and after a few minutes on it, we wanted to lube up everything we own. There's a nice page that lists about 100 around the house tasks and the lube that's best suited. There are also some seasonal uses here. This doesn't reflect on the actual performance of the lubes, but it's a smart approach for the company to take.

These lubes will be about $5 a can and should be at your local Ace and Lowes, but for a full retailer list, check out the Liquid Wrench website.

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (1) | social bookmarking

February 5, 2010

WD-40 Blue Works - Review

blue_works.JPGFor most of us, a can of WD-40 is all we need. It acts as a lubricant, a penetrant, a cleaner, and, for some, a deodorant. It's sort of a 'one can fits all' product. But for those who are really into their lubes, sprays, and foams, or for those rare occasions when the WD just won't cut it, WD-40 (the company, not the product) has just released a line of eight specialized items geared toward the heavy-duty and the hardcore, and, thankfully for us, they sent us a few cans to check out.

The new products are:


  • Industrial Grade Silicone

  • Industrial Grade High-Performance PTFE Lubricant

  • Industrial Grade Dry Lube PTFE Formula

  • Industrial Grade Multi-Purpose Lubricant

  • Industrial Grade White Lithium Grease

  • Industrial Grade Contact Cleaner

  • Industrial Grade Penetrant

  • Industrial Grade Degreaser

Reviewing things like this isn't easy. It takes too long and is too tedious to rust a couple bolt/nut combos together just to test out the Blue Works Penetrant against the leading brand. So we just put the cans on the shelf and used them as needed. Of the products, we tested out the Penetrant, the De-Greaser, the White Lithium Grease, and the Silicone.

The one we ended up using the most was the silicone, which had no issues assisting us with a gummed up slider and a couple sticky windows, as well as a few stuck wrenches. The White Lithium Grease, we put right in the truck (our old boss once said, "every old truck needs a can of white lithium grease under the driver's seat), and the penetrant did actually help loosen a rusty nut.

We liked the products and the cans have a cool look about them. The Blue Works website has a boatload of information on each one, including the MSDS sheets and scientific-sounding test results that firmly establish their dominance against other brands. We take a lot of those types of manufacturer's tests with a grain of salt, but WD-40 has a great reputation, so even if their products aren't 50 times better than the competition, they're at least 5 times better.

So now when WD-40 isn't doing the job or you're looking for something a little more specialized, you now have a place to go.

There's a boatload more information (including the MSDS sheets) over at blueworksbrand.com

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (0) | social bookmarking

December 22, 2009

DAP Seal 'N Peel Removable Weatherstrip Caulk - Review

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To say our house is 'drafty' is a bit of an understatement. To say that there's actually turbulence at head level is more like it. In the summer it's easy to get all misty-eyed over the ancient windows filled with their wiggly, wavy old panes of glass. In the winter though, those windows are nothing less than the enemy. The other night, we were walking around taking temperature readings with the digital laser thermometer and one of our windowsills read a balmy 38 degrees (keep in mind, this is on the inside of the house). Think about that for a second. It's insane. We actually can't think about it for any longer than a second or we get heart palpitations.

dap_peel_seal_pull.jpgSo enter DAP, a company nice enough to send us a tube of their new Seal N Peel removable weatherstrip caulk. The principal of the product is simple; caulk it in along open joints in windows, doors, wherever there's a draft, and come spring, just peel it off. It's a nice fine line that DAP is walking here, a caulk that's sticky enough to stick but at the same time, unsticky enough to be easily pulled off months later.

We had a big red flag go up when we saw that the tube was labeled, "vanilla scent." The only reason a product like this would have an vanilla scent would be if it needed to mask a horrific chemical smell, leading to one of two outcomes: 1) in order to hide the odor, the vanilla is intensely powerful or 2) the vanilla doesn't work and the nasty chemical smell is unavoidable. Before opening the tube, we checked the reviews over at Amazon and saw that a few people were complaining about the fumes.

dap_peel_seal_bead.jpgSo we cut the tube and went to work, expecting to be lightheaded within minutes. We're not sure if we were anticipating the worse, but it's really not that bad. Is it a smell we want made into an aftershave? Probably not. But were we running for the door in a HazMat suit? Not at all.

From what we experienced the product works great. We did a couple windows and completely stopped the drafts. The snout of the tube is extra long so getting into odd spots was easy. We also dropped a few beads on a piece of pine to test how easy the Seal 'N Peel is to remove. It comes up like a charm. The packaging does say, though, that after a year, it gets more difficult to remove.

Seal 'N Peel goes for about $6 a tube. It's a small price to pay for stopping the wind through the dining room.

At Amazon.com

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (2) | social bookmarking

August 3, 2009

DAP PRO Caulk 4-Piece Caulking Tool Kit - Review

DAP_caulk_tools.jpgOne of the first articles on Tool Snob was about the Caulk Buddy, a little caulking tool that comes with one of the Newborn caulking guns. We liked it because it was something, other than our finger, that could make a nice caulk bead. With this in mind, we were particularly interested in testing out the DAP PRO Caulk Tool Kit (As seen on TV!). What it is is a series of little tools that have different radiuses, ranging from standard to 90 degree to a variety of mm sizes (5 to 16). There's even a little nub on one tool that is meant for grouting tile joints.

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To test out these items, we banged together two pieces of 3/4" ply at a 90 degree angle and dropped a ragged bead of caulk along the joint. First, we took the standard corner and ran it down the bead. The results were nice and about what we're used to using the finger and rag method. Although this time, our finger stayed clean and there was no rag needed. We were also once again reminded of how much caulk can be wasted by seeing the amount left on the tool. Then, satisfied that the PRO Caulk tools could at least measure up to the old way of doing things, we pumped out a huge line of caulk in order to test out the larger size beads. This time, the results were something that we wouldn't be able to do with a finger and a rag. We started with the 10mm size and got a perfectly even bead with one quick pass of the tool. We then tested the smaller sizes by running them over the same bead, making it smaller and smaller. All of the other sizes we tested had an equal amount of success. As always, click on the image for a larger pic.

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And that's the real glory of these little tools. You can make very consistent beads of 'non-finger' sized caulk joints. Sure, you can make a nice standard bead and it's less messy than using a finger and a rag, but you can also play around with different sizes depending on your aesthetic tastes as well as the functional needs at hand. We think these tools are really successful at what they do.

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The kit also comes with a caulk removal tool that has all sorts of edges and angles to get in and under crusty old caulk beads. It would be a good item to have if you're redoing the seal on your kitchen sink or something. There is also a mini-tool with all of the smaller sizes. All of the tools are plastic and thus easy to clean off and DAP guarantees them for five years.

These are good tools to have and perfect for that milk crate in your garage marked, "painting and caulking." As a carpenter, we're going to toss ours in the box of finish tools that we carry around. Not only are they a quick and easy way to make your caulk beads look good but they also give a much wider repertoire of making consistently sized caulk beads. The tools are available with a small tube of caulking and run about $18, which we think is a little on the high side (we were hoping for the $10-$12 range), but they are quite useful.

The kit of tools is available with a small tube of caulking at Amazon.com

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (0) | social bookmarking

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