September 4, 2015

Peavey Timberjack - Review


If you ever have a yearning to feel like Paul Bunyon, you should invest in a Peavey. It's a tool for maneuvering massive logs and because of the old-fashioned mechanical advantage it's about the most satisfying tool to use. They're technically called timberjacks, but Peavy is the "Kleenex" version (the company that everyone knows the tool by). But the nomenclature doesn't matter. Even if you call them "wood-handled, metal hooky thingies" you should still get one. If you're unfamiliar with the tool, you won't believe what you can do with them.

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Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (0) | social bookmarking

August 19, 2015

McCulloch Pro Mac 10-10 Chainsaw - Review


For this installment of Chainsaw Week (TM), we're taking a look at a little slice of history: Poppa ToolSnob's McCulloch Pro Mac 10-10 Chainsaw.

To me, this tool is what always first comes to mind when someone mentions the word "chainsaw." It's the first one I ever saw and it's imprinted on me like a momma chicken is imprinted on a baby chicken. FOTS (Father of Tool Snob) has had it as long as I can remember, which probably ages it somewhere around at least the 35 year mark.

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Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (1) | social bookmarking

August 18, 2015

Kobalt 80-Volt 18-inch Cordless Chainsaw - Review


As part of our ongoing festivities with Chainsaw Week (TM), we're now going to take a look at the new Kobalt 80-volt 18-inch Cordless Chainsaw ($300).

The first thing I noticed is that it's an 18-inch model, which is rare for a cordless chainsaw. Most of the manufacturers seem to opt for the smaller 12 or 14-inch bars. But this one is backed by a mondo 80-volt battery, so it can supposedly crank out enough power to chug the longer bar through wood.

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Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (0) | social bookmarking

August 17, 2015

Chainsaw Week at Tool Snob


We're kicking off our first (and possibly last) Chainsaw week.


What's happened is that I've got a massive pile of logs that I need to turn into firewood and with the renovation over, I'm finally getting time to deal with it. This newfound freedom has also coincided with me trying to get a couple chainsaw reviews wrapped up. Add the two together and... *poof* ...Chainsaw Week.

So to get everyone in the mood, let's strap on the kevlar chaps and look back at some of our old chiansaw coverage...

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Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (0) | social bookmarking

December 3, 2010

PowerSharp Chainsaw Sharpening System - Review


Have you ever sharpened a chainsaw by hand?

It blows. It really does.

It's time consuming, tedious, and we always seem to end up with bloody knuckles by the time we're through. There's the alternative of bringing the chain to the hardware store and having them sharpen it, but who wants to deal with that? So now there is a third option: the PowerSharp Chainsaw Sharpening System. Its maker, Oregon was nice enough to send us a sample to try out. In order to test it, we first had to dull the chain, and to do that, we did horrible, horrible things to our chainsaw. Things that went against everything we believe...

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Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (7) | social bookmarking

October 26, 2010

Husqvarna 576 XP AutoTune Chainsaw - Review


So what does a $1,000 chainsaw look like?


We're not kidding. This thing will set you back a grand. Well actually $909.95, but once you breach the $800 mark, who really cares? This is the Husqvarna 576 AutoTune Chainsaw. Is the engine block made of solid gold? Does it use liquefied silver for the chain lube? What gives? Why the sky-high sticker price?

When we first found out that Husqvarna was going to send us one of these saws to review, we danced around the shop in a very un-logger like fashion. We (obviously) like using tools, and we love using good tools, but when we get the chance to use an elite tool, it's a particular thrill. And at $1000, this one reeked of wonderful, pure, sugary elitism.

So what's the mystery of the Midas saw? We found out. Read on....

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Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (4) | social bookmarking

May 27, 2010

Poulan Wild Thing 18" Chainsaw - Review

poulan_hero.jpgNo one is ever going to mistake us for lumberjacks, but we're also not going to pass for city-dwellers either. Because of the wood stove and all the trees on the property, we need a half-way decent chainsaw. We happen to have gotten this Poulan a few years back as a gift from our old boss and we've been using it ever since despite the fact that it's purple and green and has the words 'Wild Thing' printed on the bar (which, thank the heavens, has finally rubbed off).

But aesthetics aside, it starts when we want it to and it cuts when we need it to. We neglect it most of the year and don't pay too much attention to properly winterizing it. From time to time, we have to fiddle with the idle, but that's not a bother. The only thing that's functionally wrong with it is that the pull cord got all tangled up once and in the process of fixing it, we lost a few revolutions of tension, so it hangs a bit loose. No big deal. It still starts.

poulan_front.jpg poulan_front_2.jpg

We don't think a whole lot about the saw (like we said, we sort of neglect it), but what spurred this review was last weekend's project of making a patio/planting bed border out of railroad ties (have you ever tried picking up a railroad tie? Oh man, are they heavy). The front of the patio has a curve in it to follow the driveway, so we had to make a number of relatively precise cuts with the saw. Like all the other times, the saw started right up and acted just like a chainsaw should. It handled the railroad ties without a problem and other than a fine creosote dust on everything and a chain the needs sharpening, all is good in the world.

Seriously, the only problem we have with the saw is the whole "Wild Thing" thing. Had this not been a gift, we would have never purchased it ourselves based on that alone. We think it's just kinda lame. Sort of like the tool equivalent to having neon lights on the under-carriage of your car.

The Wild Thing costs about $150 and as long as you can handle the look of the thing, it's a great choice for someone looking for a reliable homeowner saw without a big price tag.


Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (5) | social bookmarking

April 26, 2007

Stihl Chainsaw Selector

stihl_chainsaw.jpgStihl has just made the chainsaw buying process a whole lot easier with their online chainsaw selector. Just answer the four questions and the selector narrows you down to a few suitable chainsaws. It takes about 30 seconds and even if your budget is more Poulan than Stihl, it can still be a help, if only to find what size and class is appropriate for your uses.

And while you're at the Stihl site check out this monster. Yikes.

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (0) | social bookmarking

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