March 10, 2009

Tool Box Refrigerator

tool_fridge.jpgIf you like pounding beers while you're out 'working' in the garage but don't want anyone to know how much of a boozer you are, this could be the best $300 you'll ever spend. Designed by Genuine Hotrod Hardware, the Tool Box Refrigerator is made to look exactly like a regular old tool cabinet. In all functional respects, it's a standard dorm room fridge (complete with Dispense-A-Can can stacker!), but in order to hide it's real purpose, the fridge has simulated drawer pulls, a top drawer lock, and it rolls around on locking casters.

At SkyMall

via Random Good Stuff

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (0) | social bookmarking

February 12, 2009

Rockwell JawHorse Plywood Jaw Accessory Attachment

rockwell_plywood_jaw.jpgTwo weeks ago, we reviewed the JawHorse, Rockwell's one-stop workshop assistant, and last week we talked a bit about the log jaw attachment, and now, here's a little something about the Plywood Jaw attachment.

This one is simple enough. The standard Jawhorse jaws can open up to 37" wide, making them just barely able to handle a 36" door (something we've use it to hold quite a few times). But as wide as that is, it is still short of the magic 48" needed for sheet goods. The Plywood Jaw Accessory is a replacement part for the movable jaw that is longer. Exchanging the two shouldn't be any problem at all, the existing one just slides out and the new one slides in.

Rockwell makes mention of some stability issues when dealing with larger-sized items in the JawHorse, so if you're going to use the PlyWood attachment, it's worth it to think of those sorts of things. The last thing you want is a collapsing work bench.

The JawHorse Plywwod Accessory costs about $50, which feels a little pricey to us, but given the sturdiness of the JawHorse, it's likely a very well made item.

At Amazon.com and Rockwell

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (0) | social bookmarking

February 5, 2009

JawHorse Log Jaw Attachment

rockwell_log_jaw.jpgWe like that Rockwell is thinking 'big picture' with the JawHorse (our review here). We established last week that it's a fantastic tool to have in the workshop, but how about out by the woodshed? Well, Rockwell is making sure that the tool is a success there too with the release of the Log Jaw Attachment.

It looks like the Log Jaws attach right to the existing ones and give the tool the ability to hold on to a log of up to 12" in diameter. There is also some sort of vise that folds out, allowing you to hold a chainsaw blade for sharpening. Add to that all the features already inherent in the JawHorse; the one ton of clamping force, the easy-to-use foot pedal, and the stable tri-pod legs and you've got something of a winner.

This looks like a great idea to anyone into carving (Arbortech Power Chisel and Mini-Grinder, anyone?) or if you're like us and you've got a wood stove and a penchant for scavenging fallen trees in the woods behind your house.

The Log Jaw Attachment costs about $40.

At Amazon.com and Rockwell

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January 26, 2009

Rockwell Jawhorse - Review

jawhorse.jpgMan's two most ancient needs are the need for shelter and the need for food. It's a little known fact that the third item on the list is the need to crush things; whether it be an ant, a beer can, or the annoying kid who lives next door. Anyway, this is where the Rockwell Jawhorse comes in, and why it is an essential tool for every single person on the planet. But the fun doesn't stop with crushing things, in fact, the Jawhorse is about as multi-purpose as a tool gets.

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Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (4) | social bookmarking

October 15, 2008

PDY Systems Lift-N-Lok Organizer - Review

lift_n_lok_all_open.jpgWe're starting to have a bit of a storage issue. The big stuff is fine, it can go on shelves, it's the small stuff that starting to get to us.; the small hand tools that keep ending up in a pile at the end of the workbench; the fasteners that we have so few of left, they don't deserve a box, but we hate throwing them out; things like our glue gun and our Skil Power Wrench, which aren't big enough for their own dedicated box, but which also have enough accessories that there needs to be some containment. We recently tried out a new organizer called the Lift-N-Lok to see if that would help us with our clutter problems.

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September 3, 2008

DIY Storage Helpers

clement_storage.gifStorage and organization is a constant problem for us and we're guessing many of you as well. Just the other day, we spent a good deal of time dealing with the giant pile of tools, fasteners, and lumber that had accumulated over the past weeks. It's no fun to do and we always have to deal with a vague sense of failure when we do it. Is it that tough to put things away when you're done with them?

The trick is, obviously, to have a place for everything (and everything in its place), instead of some hazy "I sort of keep these over here, and sometimes (but not all the time), I put those over here," concept of organization. With this in mind, our pal Mark Clement has come to the rescue with a nice article on tool organization. In it, he leads us through the construction of a workbench, a cart, a tool belt hook, and a bracket for cord storage. As always with Mark's articles, it's informative, clearly written, and accompanied with some nice photos.

We also highly recommend Sandor Nagyszalanczy's (say that five times fast) Setting Up Shop if you're looking for a far more detailed look at the principals behind good shop organization.

Read Mark's article here at Extreme How-To.

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (0) | social bookmarking

August 29, 2008

Razordeck 360 - Self Erecting Scaffolding System

This is very cool. It's just out in Europe at the moment. It's got a maximum height of 3.6 meters (just under 12 feet), with two other working heights; 1.2 meters (around four feet) and 1.8 (around six feet). It sells for 3295 pounds, which is about $6000 U.S. More information here.

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (0) | social bookmarking

June 11, 2008

Stand-Up-Guy

stand-guy.jpgAnyone who has ever tinkered around on a door has likely made a couple little stands to set the door in so you can work on the hinge side in a standing position. Now, there's something called the Stand Up Guy, which is simply a plastic, adjustable version of that very same plywood stand that you hacked together.

The Stand-Up-Guy is adjustable (their website doesn't say to what dimensions), and works the way the more advanced homemade versions do. The outside ends of the stand are slightly raised, so when the door/window/whatever is placed in the center, the stand lightly clamps in on it. The Stand-Up-Guy has a recommendation from the Handyman Club of America.

The Stand-Up-Guy sells for a whopping $45 apiece! Maybe we'd think about $45 for a pair, but seeing the kind of success that we have with the homemade kind (which usually take us about five minutes to make), we're not sure that this is worth the coin.

At McFeely's

Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (0) | social bookmarking

April 15, 2008

SawHelper Ultrafence Portable Miter Saw Stand

Sawhelper.jpgA lot of the tool world is dominated by the likes of Bosch, Ryobi, DeWalt, Milwaukee, and the other big name tool manufacturers. There's no doubt that they make some great tools, but we always like it when some little company produces a tool that runs so far ahead of the pack that it could only be the product of a small group of single minded people. Sawtooth Specialty Tools' SawHelper Ultrafence is like that. It's a very unique miter saw stand and ever since we first caught wind of it a few years back we haven't yet heard a single negative thing about it.

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Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (6) | social bookmarking

March 1, 2008

Festool MFT/3 Workbench

Festool_-mft3.jpgAlong with the two routers (MFK 700 and OF 2200), Festool has also just announced the release of their new workbench, the MFT/3. From the looks of it, Festool has combined and improved the best aspects of their previous two models (MFT 1080 and MFT 800).

The MFT/3 provides a 43" x 28" work surface at a height of 35-1/2". One of the four legs is slightly adjustable for use on uneven surfaces. The four edges of the workbench have tracks on them which allow you to join up multiple tables, giving you a larger workspace if needed. The entire until weighs 61 lbs and the legs fold up to make it somewhat portable.

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Doug Mahoney at Permalink | Comments (0) | social bookmarking

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