May 23, 2011

Channellock #87 Rescue Tool - Review

channellock_rescue87_hero.JPG

Channellock has recently released the third version of their rescue tool. This latest generation is smaller than the rest and can fit in a back pocket. Designed for firefighters, first responders, and EMTs, the little item is filled with features that have little to do with everyday construction projects and everything to do with saving lives.

The tool is basically a set of heavy-duty wire-cutters with some feature heavy handles. The cutters are for things like battery cables and other bits of soft metal. The handles have a gas shut-off slot, a thick pry bar for windows and doors, and a spanner wrench for 5" hose couplings (got any of those kicking around the house...didn't think so).

channellock_rescue87_back.JPG

Reviewing this item is a bit tricky. It's not like we're going to go and set a house on fire just to see if we can get everyone out in time. Honestly, our experience with Channellock tools lends us to think, "well if Channellock says the tool works, well then, the tool works." We understand that doing that isn't really a full review (although reputation can indeed play a role in a review), so what we did was to head over to Amazon and read some of the reviews of the larger Rescue Tool (the #86). As of this writing there are 11 reviews, all of which are positive. The two lowest reviews (one 2 star and a 3 star), only complain that the tool is too large and can't be carried in a pocket. Well with this new tool that problem is solved.

The only feature that we really could use were the wire cutters and they worked as advertised. The handles are solid metal and the pivot connection is the same rugged connection that is on all of our other Channellock tools.

channellock_rescue87_in_hand.JPG

So in a way, this is sort of a non-review. We can't fully use the tool, but based on what little we can do, the experience we've had with other Channellock tools, and what we can discover from searching the web, this is another solid tool.

Also, it's worth noting that the tool is made in the USA and that starting June 1st, Channellock is starting a "Buy One, Donate One" program, meaning that if you pick one of these up, you can donate another one to the firefighter of your choice. This is one of those promotions that makes our chest swell with American pride.

The #87 Rescue Tool is a little over $45.

At Channellock and (eventually) Amazon.com

Read More in: All Reviews | Hand Tools

Share this Article with others: social bookmarking

Related Articles:

Came straight to this page? Visit Tool Snob for all the latest news.

Posted by Doug Mahoney at May 23, 2011 5:58 AM

protool_innovation_award_2013.jpg

Recent Comments

I'm a firefighter and can attest to the usefulness of the large wire cutters (I currently carry a Klein pair) though I've never used this particular tool. The previous generation "rescue" tool always seemed a little too expensive and not incredibly useful with the pliers tip. This looks pretty tempting, though I'm always reluctant to purchase really nice tools for use in my gear because they tend to get damaged or lost. Looks very solid though


Posted by: Kevin at May 26, 2011 10:38 AM
Post a comment









Remember personal info?




Please enter the letter "x" in the field below:
Please press Post only once. Submission of comments takes up to 20 seconds because of Spam Filtering.

Join the Mailing List Newsletter
Enter your Email


Powered by FeedBlitz
Subscribe - RSS

facebook_badge.jpg twitter_badge.jpg

Recent Reviews
Recent Comments
chris: What saw are you trying to hook it up to? read more
Jeff Williams: It is definitely an impressive system. When our mutual friend read more
Al in SoCal: Can you give me what model I should get my read more
Jinxy37: over 6 years of hard use, I havent even seen read more
Cody: I loved this drill, it got lost in the move read more
Site Navigation

Visit our other properties at Blogpire.com!

HomePire

This weblog is licensed under a Creative Commons License.
All items Copyright © 1999-2014 Blogpire Productions. Please read our Disclaimer and Privacy Policy