May 25, 2010

Craftsman 4-Volt Lithium-Ion Cordless Pruner - Review

craftsman_pruner_hero.jpgIt's springtime here in the northeast and that means there is some pruning to be done. With this being the first year in the new place, we've come to notice how completely tangled the little fruit trees in the front yard are. They sort of look like big, green, messy muppet heads. Thankfully, for us, late last year, Craftsman sent us a sample of their new 4-volt Cordless Pruner, so last week, we charged the little thing up and spent some quality time with it.

The pruner is about the size of a tube of caulking and its got jaws that are about 1-1/2" long. Operation of the tool is pretty simple; pull back the safety lock with your last two fingers and press the trigger with your middle finger. The jaws, once in motion, have a slow and steady action.

craftsman_pruner_cutting.jpg craftsman_pruner_cut.jpg

We used the pruners for a number of operations in and around the house. It was far too bulky for our little bonsai, but it worked out fine for just about everything else. According to Craftsman, the pruner can cut branches up to 1/2". We found this to be true, but the 1/2" mark doesn't seem to come from lack of strength as much as it does the limitations created by the jaw size. The little tool had no problem with any and all 1/2" branches we threw at it and it seemed like it could cut larger branches, it just can't get its mouth around them. The cuts that it makes are nice and clean with no ragged edges.

Craftsman says that once the internal battery is fully juiced, it can make approximately 500 cuts. There was no way we were going to sit there and count cuts like some kind of forestry Rain Man, but we can say that during the time we used it, we never had to charge it up in the middle of a day, and we guess that the 500 mark is probably on target. Put it this way, unless you're really going at it, you'll get a day's worth of pruning in on a charge.

craftsman_pruner_in_hand.jpgWe were actually a little surprised that we liked this little tool so much. What we realized was that because you're not putting the effort into making the cut, you can increase your precision quite a bit. The size is a benefit as well. We were able to get into some spots that would have been difficult with traditional pruners (we no longer needed the room to open the handles).

We almost had a problem with the trigger (but didn't). Like we said before, you have to pull back a safety lock with two fingers and then pull the trigger with a third. While some sort of safety lock is absolutely necessary with this item (it wouldn't even pause going through a finger), we first thought this design was a bit awkward and that it might not be an easy set of motions for someone with aged, possibly arthritic hands (just the person we initially thought this tool would be perfect for), but once we spent a while with the tool, we came to see that the motion is, in fact, very subtle and easy to perform. We started out wondering why Craftsman didn't opt for some sort of thumb safety lock, and ended up very impressed with their engineering.

Overall, it's a nice item and if you're a gardener, particularly one who is losing some hand strength (or has none to begin with), you would probably appreciate the Craftsman Pruner.

The Pruner is $50 at Sears

Read More in: All Reviews | Cordless | Hand Tools | Lawn/Garden | Lithium-Ion

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Posted by Doug Mahoney at May 25, 2010 4:50 AM

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Recent Comments

If we wish the Chinese to buy our food, passenger airliners, and loan us money on demand, then perhaps we can find a modest level of acceptance for the many consumer goods that they send us at our request, and at very low prices.


Posted by: Marvin McConoughey at April 27, 2013 9:51 PM

I have been buying Crafsman tools and machines all my life and have purchased them for my 2 sons as well. I have always been proud to own them and they have all paid for themselves many times over. Now I have found that these tools are now being made in CHINA!! The shame, these are not the Crafsman tools we all grew up with that would last a lifetime - they are cheap CHINA knockoffs like everything else made over there and I will not buy them. What about American Crafsmanship and American Jobs? Who will buy your tools when we are all out of work?? Built to American Specs, designed by American Engineers, the global economy or strict quality control - its all a bunch of BS - come back to the USA Crafsman.


Posted by: GINO at May 27, 2010 2:57 PM
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